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It is every student's responsibility to:

  1. Read, and ensure that you understand, the University-wide Statement on plagiarism which defines plagiarism and the forms that it can take. The statement follows the Regulations for discipline in Statutes and Ordinances.
  2. Familiarise yourself with guidance issued by your faculty or department which outlines the referencing techniques and other academic conventions that you will be expected to adhere to.  This will be given to you in your handbook or other induction materials, but if you are in doubt ask your Director of Studies or Tutor.
  3. Ensure that you always follow these conventions, and ask for clarification or support if you need it from your Director of Studies or Tutor. If in doubt about any aspect of academic integrity it is always best to seek clarification at an early stage.

On our Resources and support pages, you can find more information about the various referencing conventions in use at Cambridge and guidance on good academic practice and sources of support.

 

Remember the Golden Rule: THE EXAMINERS MUST BE LEFT IN NO DOUBT AS TO WHICH PARTS OF ANY SUBMISSION ARE YOUR OWN ORIGINAL WORK AND WHICH ARE NOT.

 

Using commercial organisations and essay banks

Writing for commercial organisations or submitting work to essay banks for financial gain undermines the academic system. Working on your own degree is a far better investment than the short term profit to be gained by selling work to such companies. You should contact your Tutor if you have financial concerns: you should never need to resort to selling your work.

Similarly, buying work and submitting it as your own is unethical and a waste of the study opportunities open to you at Cambridge.

 

How the University detects and disciplines plagiarism

Your examiners are experts in their field and are therefore extremely likely to spot work that has been copied from another source or not referenced appropriately. Your faculty or department may also check the authenticity of your work by using specialist software, such as (but not only) Turnitin UK, which can detect matching text. This can identify work submitted by another student, even if they are studying at another University, as well as from the internet and particular journals.

Any suspected cases of plagiarism will be investigated by the University. This might involve initially being interviewed by the Examiners and Proctors and could ultimately lead to suspension from the University or failure.